Category Archives: Industrial

Vacancy gap between outermost and central industrial submarkets down 1,000 basis points

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COW_San Diego_industrial_April 14 2016

  • In 2009, the gap in industrial vacancy rates between San Diego County’s outmost submarkets and most central markets was 1,460 basis points. While Kearny Mesa and Miramar’s combined vacancy rate decreased 56.5 percent since 2009, the combined vacancy rate for Oceanside and Otay Mesa has decreased a whopping 64.2 percent. That gap is now down to 470 basis points.
  • At the outermost parts of
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2015 was a banner year for post-recession construction activity.

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U.S. constuction

  • Office space under construction peaked at 92.8 million square feet.
  • Industrial construction was the shining star as consumer confidence grew.
  • Construction costs increased in primary office markets, driven by skyrocketing labor costs, which motivated growth in secondary markets.

JLL’s Construction Outlook report provides valuable insight into construction trends in the U.S. and JLL San Diego’s PDS Market Lead, Julie… Read More

 

Transport-networks-are-key-to-feeding-the-world

Image Credit: Shutterstock

Global goals to increase food productivity by 70 percent by 2050 are encouraging the logistics sector to begin a fresh wave of expansion.

The task of feeding a projected global population of 9 billion within 35 years is on the agenda at the World Economic Forum’s annual meeting next week in Davos, Switzerland. Sustainable food provision on this scale will entail more local production and complex transport solutions.

But there will also be a growing need to transport food – as quickly and safely as possible – across borders and around the world. Blueberries from the U.S. and lamb from Australia and New Zealand are among a long list of perishables which must be exported to foreign markets in greater quantities if we are to have any chance of meeting the 70 percent target.

Crucial to the transportation of this produce will be a sophisticated network of refrigerated warehouses which covers key locations including transport hubs, border points and local supply and distribution centres. Aaron Ahlburn, JLL’s Director of Research for Industrial, says: “If you are going to achieve a 70 percent growth in yield it likely requires some complex, correlated growth in cold chain real estate around the world to ensure safe food storage, food quality and efficient distribution.”

More food supply crossing international boundaries increases the need for cold storage – not just because distances travelled tend to be longer but also because of the greater potential for delays. The unexpected often happens – through prolonged border controls, for instance, or labor disputes.

The UK, a large exporter of salmon and cheese, has recent experience of the dangers here; numerous truckloads of fish rotted on English shores in summer 2015 when angry ship workers blocked entry to the French port of Calais. “According the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, an estimated 40% of global food production is lost or wasted each year.   A large percentage of this loss can be attributed to the lack of adequate ‘cold chains’ – refrigerated transportation as well as distribution facilities” saysRich Thompson, Global Leader, Supply Chain & Logistics Solutions consulting at JLL.

The world’s three most populous countries – China, India and the U.S. – are the ones which have done most to build their ‘cool cargo’ networks so far. Global warehousing capacity in the sector is increasing at about 10 percent a year and has reached a total of 552 million cubic meters, according to the latest statistics from the Global Cold Chain Alliance. Included among the states that have a degree of cold storage infrastructure in place are some with the most serious political problems – such as Afghanistan and Libya.

Consumers trends to drive change

Ultimately, the actions of consumers rather than the edicts of governments will have the greatest influence on supply lines in stable countries. In particular, the growth of online grocery shopping will have a direct effect on long-distance supply and storage of fresh produce. As online ordering increases, retailers are able to use ‘big data’ analysis to monitor and predict buying habits and future demand.

However, differing cultural attitudes – especially the desire to see foodstuffs before buying – are leading to wide variations in uptake between one country to another.

Chinese consumers are proving more willing to experiment with internet purchasing than, for instance, consumers in South Africa and in France. The Chinese are expected to be ordering450 per cent more from online groceries by 2020, according to e-commerce researchers Profitero.

“Increasing interest in healthy food, and a growing middle class in locations such as China, are pushing cold chains to globalize. Global complexities, focus on cost reduction, and a lack of cold storage facilities remain big challenges, but with demand for fresh food growing, we are seeing distribution companies becoming more incentivized to overcome capacity and infrastructure constraints to meet this demand” mentions Thompson.  This means that digital buying of groceries – whether through ‘click & collect’ or home deliveries following an online order – is set to push the sector up from US$40 billion to US$180 billion by the end of the decade in the People’s Republic.

While retailers have struggled with the upfront costs and economics of entering the online sector, there are signs that the trend has bedded down in some countries. Online grocery shopping has taken six percent of the total market in the UK where over 80 percent of the population live in towns and cities and so are within easy reach of distribution networks.

Locations close to cities are ideal sites for cold storage warehouses, according to Ahlburn. “This is going to be about how close you can get your time-sensitive food storage to your end consumers,” he says. “Being close to cities is going to be a requirement as economies mature and demand increases.”

A specialist market which has to adhere to tight regulations on a range of issues from temperature control to security, the cold storage sector has been expanding in a measured way. Americold, the globe’s number one, is extending its coverage in strategic locations such as the port of Maine. Lineage Logistics, for instance, the world’s second largest cold storage player has been growing by acquisition but, so far, only in the U.S.

The technicalities of cold storage are complicated but the rationale behind the growth is simple. Take the humble tomato: produced and consumed in all five continents, its combined export value hit US$9 billion in 2015 but a fresh one lasts just a week in peak condition outside a fridge.

This article was originally published on JLL Real Views.

Industrial supply constrained with rents nearing peak levels

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US-Industrial-Outlook-Q2-2015-JLL

U.S. net absorption again is up, vacancy is tight and warehouse rents are increasing across the board in nearly every market. New construction is on the rise in a handful of markets, but overbuilding is not yet a concern based on active tenant requirements.

The nation is on track to add 171 million square feet… Read More

Growth in the construction industry is “building” and expected to continue through 2017 [SLIDESHARE]

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In late 2014, oil prices experienced significant declines due to oversaturated supply and a slowdown in global demand. Prices have since stabilized but at depressed levels. Materials prices were projected to drop in correlation with oil, but high demand for most major construction inputs has kept prices up overall.

Low gas prices typically drive an uptick in demand for retail, e-commerce, and industrial real estate. However, shipping costs remain high due to a decline in… Read More

California ranked #1 in United States for manufacturing output

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California’s prominence as a global hub for manufacturing is often underestimated. Yet, with seven well-defined geographic clusters specializing in all areas of manufacturing output, keeping a watchful eye on the golden state may offer some insight as to where the industry is headed next. What you find in this report may surprise you.

JLL’s Tim Olson Named One of Tomorrow’s Leaders in Southern California

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Tim OlsonSouthern California is one of the most active regions of the nation when it comes to commercial real estate. Be it leasing or investment, operations or advising, the CRE professionals in the area have their hands full. The active market is also providing the perfect platform for young women and men who have entered this industry in recent years. Real Estate Forum has scoured the market to identify 20 rising stars… Read More